Tuesday, 22 July 2014

Restoration of imprinted concrete or stamped concrete

Imprinted concrete or patterned concrete sometime referred as stamped concrete, is concrete that has been dyed, transformed and shaped to resemble a number of other construction materials (like brick, flagstone, tile and wood). You will be able to do the same thing with asphalt or stone but imprinted concrete now has more colours options and patterns available to suit your need. If you have a specific look in mind for a patio or pathway, most of the time imprinted concrete can deliver it.

The concrete used in the imprinted concrete is a bit thinner than normal concrete. Standard concrete usually has larger stones in it and the imprinted concrete is filtered to be much smoother. This is easier to mould it. Imprinted concrete is a relatively simple and inexpensive way to get new surfaces around your home.

What is the maintenance on imprinted concrete?
Before and after pictures:






Imprinted concrete durability and therefore low maintenance appeal to a lots of home-owners. However some maintenance is necessary to preserve the beautiful appearance of this type of paving.

Art of Clean can thoroughly clean, re-seal and re-colour the surface of the concrete if necessary. We use the latest equipment which will clean effectively, without damaging the imprinted concrete. We can also pre-treat oil and stains. We will also a fungicidal wash to ensure the removal of any algae and moss that may have built up over time.

After pressure cleaning we would seal the area to waterproof the surface and give additional protection from UV light, staining and growth.

3 simple steps for imprinted concrete restoration:
- Concrete is jet washed to remove surface grime and dirt
- Imprinted concrete sealer is applied
- Re-colouring of the concrete, if necessary

We recommend the re-sealing of the imprinted concrete every 3-4 years to keep the concrete surface looking its best.

If you have any questions, just give us a call on 01223 863632 and we will be happy to help.

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